How Electrical Contractors Can Make Their Jobs That Much Easier

Working as an electrical contractor involves a shocking amount of moving parts and considerations, including electrical knowledge, job safety, scheduling, inventory, new technology/equipment training, irregular corners or turns in wiring, marketing, team management, payroll, and local permits (just to name a few). Before you get overwhelmed, use these four tips on how electrical contractors can make their jobs that much easier.

Preparation

Before you start work, go over the specifics of the job and the workspace in excruciating detail, specifically looking for potential setbacks so that you can anticipate them before they happen. Gas line or plumbing lines, sharp corners, electrical appliances, and other oddities can be managed much easier when you know about them in advance. You should also go over the contract with the customer to establish expectations and move forward on the same page.

Electric Benders for Rigid Conduit

All electricians know that rigid conduits provide durability and reliability. However, they don’t always make the best choice when the electrical wiring encounters a corner or a turn. If you try to force the shape, you may end up damaging the conduit. Stock up on electric benders for rigid conduit to facilitate corners without damaging the rigid conduit.

Office Management Software

Small electrical companies often make the mistake of sticking to old-school ways of doing business. Bring yourself to the digital world with user-friendly office management software. Office management software usually includes tools to manage expenses, employee schedules, customer appointments, and internal communications. If you find yourself in the field every single day, look for software that includes an app for your smartphone. Don’t allow backend organizations to go under the radar, as that can result in mistakes and angry customers.

High Quality Safety Equipment

126 employees experienced fatal electrical injuries at the workplace in 2020. Electricians, naturally, have the most risk since they work with electrical wiring regularly. Give yourself peace of mind by investing in high-quality safety equipment and safety gear. OSHA suggests the following protective gear for electricians:

  • Rubber boots
  • Rubber sleeves
  • Safety goggles
  • Flame-resistant clothing
  • Hood
  • Hard hat

On top of proper safety equipment, have all employees go through extensive safety training. Create a uniform disciplinary policy in case an employee fails to adhere to safety rules.

When you work hard at the beginning to prepare for all situations, you will greatly reduce the number of unexpected delays or bill increases.